Mastering the Art of CAPA Verification: Ensuring Effective Corrective Actions in the Medical Device Industry

Posted: April 3, 2023

Mastering the Art of CAPA Verification: Ensuring Effective Corrective Actions in the Medical Device Industry

As someone who has managed a Corrective and preventive actions (CAPAs) program in a large medical device company, I have extensive experience in ensuring effective corrective actions. In my role, I was responsible for training engineers on how to run and manage successful CAPAs, and I am proud to say that our program was audited numerous times by the FDA, with no findings against it. This experience has given me a deep understanding of the importance of proper CAPA verification and the crucial role it plays in the medical device industry.

CAPAs are an essential part of any medical device company’s quality management system. CAPAs aim to identify, investigate, and correct problems that can affect product quality or patient safety. However, simply implementing a CAPA is not enough to ensure compliance with regulatory requirements. It is crucial to verify the effectiveness of the CAPA to confirm that it has been successful in addressing the root cause of the problem.

This blog will explore the importance of verifying the effectiveness of CAPAs, the regulatory requirements for verification, common inspection/audit findings for ineffective verification, examples of CAPA verification methods, how to determine the most appropriate measurement for your effectiveness check, and steps to take when verification of effectiveness finds that the corrective actions are not effective. We will also discuss steps to take to ensure the effectiveness of effectiveness is done for CAPAs.

Table of Contents

When to verify the Effectiveness a CAPA

A medical device CAPA is a quality system process that is designed to identify, investigate, and resolve problems and non-conformities related to medical devices. It is an essential component of a medical device manufacturer’s quality system, which is required to comply with regulatory requirements such as the FDA’s Quality System Regulation (QSR) in the United States.

A medical device CAPA process involves a number of steps, typically 7 steps. Step 6 is usually the verification of effectiveness step. 

Step 1 Identification: Identifying a problem or non-conformance with a medical device through customer complaints, internal audits, or other quality system processes.

Step 2 Open CAPA: A CAPA is opened if deemed necessary.

Step 3 Investigation: Investigating the root cause of the problem or non-conformance using appropriate tools and techniques such as failure analysis, statistical analysis, or process mapping.

Step 4 Identify Corrective Action(s): Taking corrective action to address the problem or non-conformance, which may include repair, replacement, or modification of the medical device, as well as changes to manufacturing processes or quality system procedures.

Step 5 Identify Preventive Action(s): Taking preventive action to prevent the problem or non-conformance from recurring in the future, which may include changes to design or manufacturing processes, training, or other quality system improvements.

Step 6 Verification of Effectiveness: The company evaluates the effectiveness of the corrective action taken to address the non-conformance. The purpose of this stage is to ensure that the action taken has effectively resolved the issue and prevented it from recurring in the future. The verification of effectiveness stage should be conducted based on measurable, objective criteria established during the CAPA process.

Step 7 CAPA Closure: Once the effectiveness of the corrective action(s) has been verified through the verification of effectiveness stage the CAPA can be closed.

Verification: Verifying that the corrective action was effective in addressing the problem or non-conformance, which may involve retesting the device, conducting a follow-up audit, or analyzing data.

Learn more indept information about CAPA by taking our virtual 1 day  course Introduction to CAPA for Medical Devices.

The Importance of Verifying the Effectiveness of a CAPA

Simply implementing corrective actions is not enough to ensure long-term success of a CAPA. It is equally important to verify the effectiveness of the corrective actions, to ensure that the root cause of the problem has been addressed and the corrective actions have been effective.

The main reasons for taking CAPA plans through effectiveness checks include:

Ensure compliance: Verification of the effectiveness of CAPA plans is necessary to ensure that medical device manufacturers are in compliance with regulatory requirements.

Improve patient safety: The primary goal of CAPA plans is to address problems or non-conformities with medical devices that may impact patient safety. Verification of the effectiveness of CAPA plans helps to ensure that the underlying issues have been appropriately addressed and that patients are protected.

Continuous improvement: CAPA plans are intended to identify and address issues with medical devices, but they are also an opportunity for continuous improvement. Verification of the effectiveness of CAPA plans helps to ensure that the quality system is continuously improving and that medical devices are meeting or exceeding performance standards.

Cost-effectiveness: CAPA plans can be costly in terms of time, resources, and implementation. Verification of the effectiveness of CAPA plans helps to ensure that the investment in these actions is worthwhile and leads to improved quality and patient outcomes, making it cost-effective in the long term.

Risk management: CAPA plans are designed to mitigate risks associated with medical devices. Verification of the effectiveness of CAPA plans helps to identify whether those risks have been appropriately addressed or not.

Medical device factory worker checking a capa's effectiveness.

Regulatory Requirements for Verification of Effectiveness

Both the US FDA’s Quality System Regulation (QSR) for medical devices, 21 CFR 820, and the international standard for medical device quality management systems, ISO 13485, require that CAPAs must be verified as effective before they are closed.

In 21 CFR 820.100(d), the FDA’s QSR states that “Each manufacturer shall document the methods used, the results obtained, and the conclusions drawn from any validation, verification, or validation of the corrective and preventive action taken to ensure that such action is effective and does not adversely affect the finished device.”  This requirement explicitly states that the effectiveness of CAPA actions must be validated or verified, and documented prior to closing the CAPA.

Similarly, in Clause 8.5.2(j) of ISO 13485:2016, it states that “The organization shall evaluate the effectiveness of any corrective action taken and, if necessary, shall make changes to the quality management system.” This requirement implies that the effectiveness of the corrective action must be evaluated before the CAPA can be closed.

In summary, both 21 CFR 820 and ISO 13485 require that CAPAs must be verified as effective before they are closed, emphasizing the importance of ensuring that the root cause of the problem has been addressed and the corrective action has been effective in preventing recurrence of the issue.

Both the US FDA's Quality System Regulation (QSR) for medical devices, 21 CFR 820, and the international standard for medical device quality management systems, ISO 13485, require that CAPAs must be verified as effective before they are closed.

Learn more about the Quality System Regulatory CAPA requirements by taking our elearning course 21 CFR 820.100 (Medical Device CAPA).

Common Inspection/Audit Findings for Ineffective Verification of Effectiveness

It is important for medical device companies to understand that there are often inspection/audit findings for ineffective verification of effectiveness of CAPAs because such findings can have serious consequences for their business. If a regulatory agency finds that a company’s CAPAs are not effective or are not being properly verified, it can result in enforcement actions such as warning letters, fines, or even product recalls. This can damage the company’s reputation, result in lost revenue, and potentially harm patient safety. It is often cited in FDA warning letters and Form 483 observations that medical device companies are not meeting the verification of effectiveness requirements. Some of the common reasons cited for this include:

Inadequate documentation: Companies may not have adequate documentation to demonstrate that the effectiveness of the CAPA has been verified. This can include missing or incomplete data, lack of trend analysis, or failure to establish acceptance criteria.

Lack of objective evidence: Companies may not have objective evidence to demonstrate that the CAPA has been effective. This can include relying on subjective opinions or assumptions, rather than quantitative data or statistical analysis.

Inadequate follow-up: Companies may not conduct adequate follow-up to ensure that the CAPA has been fully implemented and is effective in addressing the root cause of the problem.

Failure to link CAPA objectives and metrics: Companies may not establish clear links between the CAPA objectives and the metrics used to verify effectiveness. This can result in ineffective or inappropriate metrics being used to assess the effectiveness of the CAPA.

Lack of management oversight: Medical device companies may not have adequate management oversight to ensure that CAPA verification activities are properly planned, executed, and documented.

Furthermore, ineffective verification of effectiveness of CAPAs can lead to a failure to identify and address underlying issues in the quality management system. This can result in a cycle of recurring problems and corrective actions, leading to a drain on resources and a loss of productivity.

There are several approaches to verifying the effectiveness of CAPA plans, and the most appropriate approach will depend on the specific circumstances and goals of the CAPA plan. However, some common qualitative and quantitative methods that can be used are:

Qualitative methods:

Document review: Reviewing documentation related to the CAPA plan, such as investigation reports, corrective and preventive action plans, and verification and validation documents, can help to identify whether the plan was adequately implemented and whether the expected outcomes were achieved.

Interviewing personnel: Interviewing personnel involved in the implementation of the CAPA plan can help to understand the challenges and successes of the plan, as well as identify opportunities for improvement.

Observation: Observing the implementation of the CAPA plan can help to identify whether the plan was executed as intended and whether the expected outcomes were achieved.

Quantitative methods:

Statistical analysis: Conducting statistical analysis of data related to the CAPA plan, such as complaint data, quality control data, or customer feedback data, can help to identify whether the plan was effective in improving the quality of the medical device.

Testing and validation: Conducting testing and validation of the medical device after the implementation of the CAPA plan can help to identify whether the expected improvements in the device’s performance were achieved.

Data analysis: Analyzing data related to the CAPA plan, such as the time to implement the plan, the cost of implementation, and the number of non-conformities before and after implementation, can help to identify the effectiveness of the plan.

In summary, the best approach to verifying the effectiveness of CAPA plans in the medical device industry will depend on the specific situation and goals of the plan. Qualitative methods such as document review, interviewing personnel, and observation can provide valuable insights into the implementation of the plan, while quantitative methods such as statistical analysis, testing and validation, and data analysis can provide objective measures of the plan’s effectiveness.

Determining the most Appropriate Measurement for your Effectiveness Check

To determine the most appropriate measurement for your effectiveness check for a medical device CAPA, you may consider using the following technique:

Define the objective of the CAPA plan: Clearly defining the objective of the CAPA plan will help to identify the key performance indicators (KPIs) that need to be measured to determine the effectiveness of the plan.

Identify the critical success factors: Identify the critical success factors (CSFs) for the CAPA plan, which are the factors that are essential for achieving the objective. This will help to identify the key metrics that need to be measured.

Develop a measurement plan: Develop a measurement plan that outlines the metrics to be used to measure the effectiveness of the CAPA plan. The plan should identify the data sources, data collection methods, and data analysis methods to be used.

Evaluate the feasibility of the metrics: Evaluate the feasibility of the metrics in terms of their reliability, validity, sensitivity, and specificity. Choose the metrics that are most appropriate based on their ability to accurately and reliably measure the effectiveness of the CAPA plan.

Consider industry best practices: Consider industry best practices for measuring the effectiveness of CAPA plans in the medical device industry. Review regulatory requirements, guidance documents, and industry standards to ensure that the metrics selected are consistent with industry best practices.

Evaluate the effectiveness of the CAPA based on the analysis of the data. This should include an assessment of whether the CAPA has addressed the underlying problem, and whether any new issues or trends have emerged that require further action.

CAPA Verification of Analysis statistical method

Example of how the Verification of Effectiveness of a CAPA could be done

Let me provide you with an example of how the verification of effectiveness stage for a CAPA could be completed, where the corrective actions involve adding a checklist form to correct a process deficiency:

In this example, let’s say that a manufacturing company identified a problem with process Sub-assembly Line 4, where products were being produced with inconsistent quality due to a lack of standardization in the process. The company initiated a CAPA to investigate the root cause of the problem and identified that a checklist form (CL-10) needed to be added to the process to ensure that all steps were completed consistently.

The corrective action plan for the CAPA involved adding the checklist form (CL-10) to the process, and ensuring that all operators completed the form and saved it in the appropriate location. The company established a timeframe of 1 month for the corrective action plan to be implemented. To verify the effectiveness of the corrective action plan, the company could take the following steps:

Define the success criteria: Before beginning the verification of effectiveness stage, it is important to define what success looks like for the CAPA. In this case, success would be that the process step deficiency in process Sub-assembly Line 4 has been corrected and the new checklist form CL-10 is being completed by the operator and attached to the batch paperwork as required.

Develop a sampling plan: To ensure a reasonable sampling to demonstrate consistent realization and results, a sampling plan should be developed. The sampling plan could include selecting a sample of batches that have gone through process Sub-assembly Line 4 since the CAPA was implemented.

Collect data: Data can be collected by reviewing the batch paperwork for the selected sample of batches to confirm that the new checklist form SYM-001 is completed and signed by the operator, and attached to the paperwork as required.

Analyze the data: The collected data should be analyzed to determine if the success criteria have been met. For example, if all the batch paperwork in the sample had the completed and signed checklist form CL-10 attached, then the success criteria have been met.

Verify the results: To ensure the results are defensible, the verification of effectiveness should be reviewed and verified by a cross-functional team, including representatives from quality assurance, production, and other relevant departments.

Update documentation: Finally, the results of the verification of effectiveness should be documented and communicated to all relevant personnel. If the success criteria were not met, the CAPA may need to be revised and the verification of effectiveness stage repeated.

By following these steps, a medical device company can effectively verify the effectiveness of their CAPA and ensure compliance with regulations.

The Importance of Documenting Verification Checks

Documenting the verification checks done in a CAPA plan is an essential part of the CAPA process. Proper documentation provides evidence that the verification of effectiveness stage has been completed and ensures that the CAPA has been successful in addressing the root cause of the problem.

Why is documenting verification checks done in a CAPA important?

  1. Evidence of CAPA success: Documenting the verification checks done in a CAPA provides evidence that the CAPA has been successful in addressing the root cause of the problem. This documentation is essential for demonstrating compliance with regulatory requirements.
  2. Transparency and accountability: Documenting the verification checks done in a CAPA enables transparency and accountability. It provides a clear record of the verification process, who conducted the checks, when they were conducted, and what the results were.
  3. Facilitates Continuous Improvement: Proper documentation of verification checks in a CAPA enables manufacturers to analyze data and identify opportunities for continuous improvement in the QMS.
  4. There are regulatory requirements for documenting verification checks in a CAPA: Regulatory bodies such as the FDA and ISO require medical device manufacturers to document the verification checks done in a CAPA plan. According to FDA 21 CFR 820.100(b), documentation of the CAPA process, including verification activities, must be maintained. Similarly, ISO 13485:2016 requires medical device manufacturers to document verification activities, including the results of the verification, the date of the verification, and the individual responsible for the verification.

There are significant consequences of inadequate documentation of effectiveness checks. Inadequate documentation of verification checks in a CAPA plan can lead to compliance issues, product recalls, and even legal liabilities. Failing to document verification checks can lead to regulatory action, including warning letters, fines, and even loss of product clearance or approval.

Tips for effective documentation of verification checks in a CAPA plan

  1. Use a consistent format for documenting verification checks, including the criteria used for acceptance.
  2. Ensure that all necessary information is recorded, including who conducted the verification checks, when they were conducted, and the results.
  3. Keep all documentation organized and easily accessible.
  4. Ensure that all documentation is reviewed and approved by the appropriate personnel.
  5. Ensure that all documentation is retained for the required length of time, as specified by regulatory requirements.

Documenting the verification checks done in a CAPA plan is an essential part of the CAPA process.

Documenting CAPA verification of effectiveness activities.

Steps to take when Corrective Actions are not Effective

If the corrective actions implemented as part of a medical device CAPA are found not to be effective during the verification of the effectiveness step, the medical device company should take immediate action to investigate and address the issue. Some steps that can be taken include:

Conducting a root cause analysis: The medical device company should investigate the issue to determine why the corrective actions were not effective. This may involve reviewing documentation, conducting tests, or gathering feedback from users.

Developing a new corrective action plan: Based on the results of the root cause analysis, the medical device company should develop a new corrective action plan that addresses the underlying issue. This may involve implementing new processes, making design changes, or improving training programs.

Implementing the new corrective actions: The medical device company should implement the new corrective actions as soon as possible to prevent further issues from occurring.

Conducting additional verification of effectiveness checks: The medical device company should conduct additional verification of effectiveness checks to ensure that the new corrective actions are effective. This may involve using different techniques, such as trend analysis or audits, to verify the effectiveness of the new corrective actions.

Documenting the process: Throughout the entire process, the medical device company should document all steps taken, including the root cause analysis, development of the new corrective action plan, implementation of the new corrective actions, and verification of effectiveness checks. This documentation will be important for demonstrating compliance with quality system regulations and for future audits by regulatory bodies.

In summary, when corrective actions implemented as part of a medical device CAPA are found not to be effective, the medical device company should take swift action to investigate and address the issue, develop a new corrective action plan, implement the new corrective actions, conduct additional verification of effectiveness checks, and document the entire process.

We designed a number of online training courses about structured problem solving tools. These include the 5 Whys MethodAffinity Analysis and Fishbone Diagram

How to Ensure Engineers Complete the "Verification of Effectiveness" Stage of a CAPA

While the verification of effectiveness is critical, many organizations struggle to ensure that their engineers complete this stage. It can be a challenging task to ensure that engineers follow the verification procedures and provide the necessary documentation, which can lead to delays and potential quality issues down the line.

Here are some ways a medical device company could ensure that engineers working on CAPA know the importance of the “verification of effectiveness” stage of a CAPA and that they actually do that part of the CAPA process:

Training: Provide comprehensive training to all engineers involved in the CAPA process, which emphasizes the importance of the “verification of effectiveness” stage. This can include training on regulatory requirements, risk management, and quality management principles.

Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs): Develop and implement standard operating procedures that clearly outline the steps for verifying the effectiveness of a CAPA plan. This can include guidance on documentation requirements, data analysis, and acceptance criteria.

Quality Metrics: Implement quality metrics that track the effectiveness of the CAPA process, including the verification of effectiveness stage. This can include metrics that measure the timeliness and completeness of verification activities, as well as the effectiveness of corrective and preventive actions.

Auditing: Conduct regular audits of the CAPA process to ensure that engineers are following established procedures and that the verification of effectiveness stage is being completed appropriately. This can include both internal and external audits.

Performance Management: Tie the completion of the verification of effectiveness stage to performance management metrics for engineers. This can include setting targets for completion times, quality of documentation, and effectiveness of CAPA plans.

By implementing these measures, a medical device company can ensure that engineers working on CAPA plans understand the importance of the “verification of effectiveness” stage and are motivated to complete this critical step in the process.

Conclusion


In conclusion, the verification of effectiveness stage is a crucial step in the CAPA process. It ensures that the corrective actions taken have resolved the issue and that there is no recurrence. It is also a regulatory requirement that organizations must comply with.

To ensure effective verification of effectiveness, organizations need to determine the most appropriate measurement method and ensure that engineers complete the necessary documentation. Failure to do so can result in regulatory non-compliance and potential quality issues.

This blog has provided an overview of the importance of verifying the effectiveness of CAPAs, regulatory requirements, common inspection/audit findings, and examples of verification methods. We have also discussed steps to take when corrective actions are found to be ineffective and how to ensure that the verification of effectiveness is done correctly.

By following the tips and examples provided in this blog, organizations can ensure that their CAPA process is effective, compliant, and that their products meet the highest quality standards.

Struggling with your CAPA system? Contact us today for expert guidance and support!

Sign up to our Newsletter
Stay up to date with our latest news by subscribing to The Learning Reservoir’s newsletter! As a subscriber, you’ll receive exclusive access to our latest blog posts, expert insights, and updates on our latest courses and training programs. Plus, you’ll be the first to hear about our special offers and promotions. Don’t miss out on this valuable resource – sign up today!




    You can request the removal of your details at any time by clicking the link in the footer of the emails or by emailing us at info@thelearningreservoir.com

    SHARE THIS POST

    Dr. Fiona Masterson

    Dr. Fiona Masterson

    With over 25 years’ experience in quality management, operations management,
    and higher education, Fiona combines technical expertise with highly engaging
    training. She has worked in fast-paced manufacturing environments including
    medical device companies, and lectures part-time in universities.
    She is a lead quality auditor and managed the CAPA programme of a leading
    medical device company.
    She has Bachelor and Master of Science degrees, and a Doctorate in
    Mechanical Engineering. Fiona has published in peer reviewed journals on
    topics such as medical device and pharmaceutical regulatory affairs, on-the job
    training and innovative training technologies and strategies. .